Things you need to do to have glowy skin

 

 

If you feel that you lack glowy skin, you should do something about that. A supple, healthy, glowy skin is the mark of beauty and self-confidence. You’ll feel like that and people will treat you that way.

Good habits, exercising and a healthy diet are essential for a glowy skin, so try to follow some simple rules concerning them.

You’ll have to begin by monitoring the amount of water you drink in a day. If you don’t drink at least 6 glasses of water, it means you’re dehydrated, and that will make your skin scaly and dry. Drinking more water will give your body the ability to hydrate the skin and flush out the toxins.

Just in case you forget to drink enough water, carry a bottle with you. Replace caffeinated drinks or sweet fizzy drinks with herbal tea.

When it comes to diet, what you really need is healthy proteins and lots of fresh fruits and vegetables. Make sure your meals are composed in such a way that they include fish. The omega 3 fatty acids it contains are great for the skin.

I know not everyone likes to eat fish, but you can go for walnuts instead, or shrimp and Brazilian nuts that have selenium, the mineral that protects your skin from wrinkling, dryness or disease.

Get your share of vitamin C to prevent sun damage and help your pimples heal faster. Besides citrus fruits, you’ll find it in kiwis, papayas and, yes, broccoli.

The balanced nutrition isn’t only about feeding the skin with lots of good stuff, lack of fiber-rich vegetables, fruits or nuts will slow down your bowel movements and you’ll start feeling and looking tired, bloated and moody because you didn’t use the restroom.

One last tip for your eating habits: add less sugar and salt in your daily meals if you want to avoid acne problems and water retention.

Acne prevention is always better. If you feel like the problem got out of hand, you should ask your doctor about it, but if you’re trying to manage occasional inconveniences, there are a few hacks.

Change the pillowcase at least once a week, stop rubbing your face and chin with your hands, and don’t skip the beauty sleep. The pillowcase bacteria and the oil on your hands might be responsible for triggering the breakouts.

As for the beauty sleep, it will reduce anxiety, weariness, stress and stress-related disorders. I don’t remember seeing stressed out people with a healthy, glowing skin.

Physical activity should be on your list for staying fit and balancing your weight, instead of using miracle devices and pills. But it also works wonders on your complexion, as the increased blood flow will make your skin glow in a short time. You can reap long term benefits if you stick to it.

A good habit you should consider when it comes to healthy skin is washing your face before bedtime with short splashes and delicately pat dry.

 

 

Chemicals you should steer clear of if you want your skin to look healthy

 

If you are careful about what you ingest through the mouth, you should also be vigilant in ensuring that what you apply to any part of your face and body is not only effective but safe and healthy as well. After all, what you put on your skin or your teeth can penetrate deeper and enter your bloodstream.

This warrants the careful evaluation and analysis of the ingredients in your beauty products applied externally. With thousands of chemicals in a variety of beauty products, it is easy to see how beauty companies are not regulated on their use of any raw material or ingredient either by the government or any organization or agency.

You won’t see any indication of product pre-approval prior to the introduction to the market. There’s just the most negligible approval process to speak of, and it only happens to be for color additives and ingredients categorized under over-the-counter medications.

Plenty of the synthetic ingredients are even skin penetrators, endocrine function disruptors, skin irritants, and carcinogens. The list of unwanted chemicals is endless but the more frequently found include:

 

Preservatives and Antimicrobials

Hundreds of commercial products use a group of chemicals called phthalates, which raise the level of softness and flexibility of plastics. The common cosmetic and personal care products phthalates include diethyl phthalate in lotions and perfumes, dibutyl phthalate in nail polish, and dimethyl phthalate in hair spray.

Aside from being linked to the increased risk of breast cancer and early breast development in girls, phthalates are known as endocrine disruptors that also cause reproductive birth defects in males and females. Be wary of ‘secret formulas’ in perfumes, deodorants, colognes, hair sprays, and moisturizers, as they could very well be phthalates in disguise.

Another common preservative to help prevent bacterial growth is formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasing preservatives (FRPs), known human carcinogens associated with nasal and nasopharyngeal occupational-related cancers.

FRPs and formaldehyde also exhibit harmfulness to the immune system and are found in cleansers, shampoos, conditioners, body washes, nail polish treatments, and eye shadows.

A commonly used antimicrobial chemical is triclosan, another recognized endocrine disruptor to the thyroid and reproductive hormones in addition to being a skin irritant. Studies have shown increasing incidences of triclosan supporting the growth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Triclosan is found in antibacterial soaps, toothpaste, and deodorants.

A widely used preservative is what are collectively known as parabens, which inhibit the growth of yeast, mold, and bacteria in cosmetic products. Despite their seemingly beneficial function, parabens have a distinct estrogen-imitating capability associated with the increased risk of breast cancer. Parabens have been found in breast tumor biopsy samples, which might indicate how easily they are absorbed through the skin.

Parabens are found in facial cleansers, shampoos, deodorants, body washes, and makeup, as well as pharmaceutical and food products.

 

Product enhancers

A small organic alcohol, polypropylene glycol is a skin-conditioning agent known to be a skin irritant and penetrator. It has been linked to hives and dermatitis in humans, with just 2 percent concentrations manifesting these sensitization effects. Hair sprays, shampoos, conditioners, makeup products, sunscreen, and moisturizers contain this chemical.

Synthetic colors such as D&C and FD&C, which come before a number, are sourced from petroleum and other coal tar chemicals. The letters represent Food (F), Drug (D), and Cosmetics (C) but the chemicals themselves are known human carcinogens and skin irritants that have also been linked to ADHD in kids.

Fragrances could be chock-full of unknown substances that cause respiratory problems, dermatitis, allergies, and potential reproductive system issues. Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES) and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) are surfactants found in a great majority of cleaning and personal care products. They cause the foaming in products but are known as lung, eye, and skin irritants.

The surfactants easily interact with other chemicals that cause respiratory and kidney damage. They are found in acne treatment, mascara, body wash, and shampoo.

 

Solvents and protective agents

A petrochemical known as toluene is sourced from petroleum or coal tar ingredients and can affect the respiratory system aside from causing skin irritation and nausea. Toluene, which is listed as methylbenzene, toluol, benzene, and phenylmethane, has been associated with immune system toxicity, fetal development damage, and potentially severe neurological harm.

Sunscreen chemicals may absorb UV light but are endocrine disruptors and tend to be easily absorbed into the body to cause cancer and cellular damage. They include Octyl Methoxycinnamate, homosalate, avobenzone, PABA, and benzophenone.

 

 

Why I Avoid Using Face Creams

There is clearly an entire industry making big bucks from torturing and terrorizing women into recognizing the first sign of aging from the very first fine wrinkle. Even women in their 20s are said to use an X number of face creams every day, like they could not live without them. I am personally against using any kind of face creams and I have very strong reasons not to.

 

You are loading your face with a magnet for grime

Seriously, no matter how great face creams may be, they are never 100% absorbed by your skin. That means that every day, when you are using day face creams, night face creams, moisturizers, eye skin creams and so on, you are just adding layer after layer that covers your skin. What does that mean? In a nutshell, you are covering all your pores and your face becomes a magnet for dust and grime. When you cleanse your face at the end of the day, what you see on your cotton wipes is exactly what your face was caked with for the entire day. If you don’t believe me, just run a small experiment and go a day without using any creams; cleanse at the end and see if there is not less disgusting dark stuff on your wipes.

 

You make your own skin lazy

When you are feeding your face skin with all kinds of chemicals and other ingredients that these creams are made from, you are offering a cane to someone who is not a cripple. Do you know what happens with a body that does not exercise? It goes flabby and unattractive, and that is exactly what happens to your skin, too. Given too much support in the form of all kinds of substances, your skin slows down and stops producing as much collagen or natural moisturizer. That is why you end up caught in a loop that forces you to use even more creams just to fight the aging process.

 

Good hygiene is better than any cream

This must be something I learned from my grandmother, as far as I can recall. Throughout my childhood, she had such a beautiful, glowing skin, even with all the wrinkles brought by age, that I thought I wanted to be like her when I grow old. She told me that good hygiene is better than anything else when it comes to caring for your face. She used to boil water, sparkle it with dry chamomile flowers and keep her face over it for 10-15 minutes. That was her secret. I personally got myself a facial steamer and I am getting the same results. My face is clean, glowing with health, and I have no intention to use any face creams.

How I Use My Facial Steamer

Whenever I am in the mood for a really great treatment for my face, I pick my KINGA Nano Ionic Facial Steam Humidifier and put it to work. I absolutely love this little machine, because it really helps me keep my face clean and young looking, without having to pay for expensive anti-aging creams and visits to the spa. It was not easy to decide one a good facial steamer but after reading numerous facial steamer reviews, I decide on the Kinga Nano.

  Here is how I use it and why I love it so much.

 

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This machine generates steam fast

One thing I was not so crazy about in the past when I had other facial steamers was that I had to wait for the steam to be produced for quite a while. Which brings me to the first thing I enjoy about this particular model. It takes only half a minute for the machine to start making steam! So, when I am ready to get my well deserved treatment, my machine is ready, too. And I am not talking about only a few droplets of mist, but about full blown steam that you use to cleanse your face. The particles produced are so fine that you will not feel like your face is just covered in water, like it happens with other models.

For more steamer benefits you can check out this article or this one.

 

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What I use it for

I am putting on makeup almost every day, so it is very important for me to undergo proper cleansing regimen. The Kinga is really a savior for me in all that concerns how I now take care of my face. First of all, the steam helps my pores to open and get cleaned properly. All the dirt, oil and makeup remains that accumulate over an entire day are eliminated once I start using the steamer. All the dead cells go away and I have noticed that anything I put on after the treatment, be it toner or nourishing cream, gets absorbed fast and easy. The best part is that since I started using the Kinga, I no longer need to spend money on expensive scrubs.

If you’d like to learn how to steam your face without a home steamer, you can read about it here.

 

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It doubles as a humidifier

I also use this facial steamer as a regular humidifier when the air inside my room drops to low humidity levels. As you may well know, dryness can cause your skin to age faster. Maintaining proper humidity levels in your home is essential for preventing early aging signs on your skin. I am more than pleased with my purchase, and I think having a personal facial steamer is really great.

 

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